Personal Diplomacy


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Summit Diplomacy


Summit Diplomacy

Author: Elmer Plischke

language: en

Publisher: Greenwood

Release Date: 1958

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This volume is a study on summit diplomacy (a meeting of high government officials for the purpose of conducting negotiations between nations) that is performed personally by the President of the United States. The author has outlined the history of presidential diplomacy but takes a closer view of the personal foreign relations efforts of Presidents Roosevelt, Truman, and Eisenhower. In this country, individual Presidents have assumed varying degrees of personal participation in foreign affairs. Some have remained relatively aloof from relations with other countries, and their names rarely appear in the diplomatic records. Others are remembered for one or a few policy statements or international actions. A number of Presidents, and in certain cases, even Vice Presidents, have engaged in personal diplomacy of some consequence. To mention only a few, diplomatic history recounts the contributions of Washington, Jefferson, Monroe, Polk, Cleveland, Truman, and Eisenhower. On the other hand, a few Presidents have played active if not decisive roles in diplomacy, occasionally virtually serving as their own Secretaries of State. Among these, in the present century, generally are included Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Personal Diplomacy in the EU


Personal Diplomacy in the EU

Author: Roland Vogt

language: en

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Release Date: 2016-10-04

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At a time when the economic troubles and bailouts of Greece and other European economies are casting significant doubt on the future viability of the Eurozone and the EU, it is crucial to examine the origins of the political will and leadership that is necessary to move the integration process forward. This book makes a significant conceptual and empirical contribution by elucidating the extent to which the integration process hinges not on institutions and norms, but on the relations among leaders. Vogt conducts a comparative diplomatic history of three critical junctures in the process of European integration: the creation of the Common Market (1955–1957), British accession (1969–1973), and the introduction of the Euro (1989–1993). He illustrates how personal diplomacy, leadership constellations, and the dynamics among leaders enable breakthroughs or inhibit accords. He also reveals how the EU’s system of top-level decision-making that privileges institutionalised summitry has operated in the past and suggests – in a separate chapter – why it has come to atrophy and prove more dysfunctional of late.

US-Egypt Diplomacy under Johnson


US-Egypt Diplomacy under Johnson

Author: Gabriel Glickman

language: en

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Release Date: 2021-01-28

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What happens to policies when a president dies in office? Do they get replaced by the new president, or do advisers carry on with the status quo? In November 1963, these were important questions for a Kennedy-turned-Johnson administration. Among these officials was a driven National Security Council staffer named Robert Komer, who had made it his personal mission to have the United States form better relations with Egypt's Gamal Abdel Nasser after diplomatic relations were nearly severed during the Eisenhower years. While Kennedy saw the benefit of having good, personal relations with the most influential leader in the Middle East-believing that it was the key to preventing a new front in the global Cold War-Johnson did not share his predecessor's enthusiasm for influencing Nasser with aid. In US-Egypt Diplomacy under Johnson, Glickman brings to light the diplomatic efforts of Komer, a masterful strategist at navigating the bureaucratic process. Appealing to scholars of Middle Eastern history and US foreign policy, the book reveals a new perspective on the path to a war that was to change the face of the Middle East, and provides an important “applied history” case study for policymakers on the limits of personal diplomacy.